BIRDING COSTA RICA LOWLAND TROPICAL FOREST

 Birding in Costa Rica's Lowland Tropical Forest

Geography

The Savegre Valley boasts one of the most diverse ecosystems in  the country. The watershed of the river starts at over 3000 meters and plummets down to the Pacific coast in less than 45 kilometers. The valley includes parts of Chirripo  and Los Quetzales National Parks. These parks make the transition from the highlands toward the sea. From the south the Biological corridor of "Pathway of the Tapir" connects the Savegre to the Osa Peninsula and the wet forests of the Corcovado National Park. From the north stretches national parks including Manuel Antonio and Carrara National Park.

History

The birds within this paradise valley are bountiful and the upper Savegre is already well known as a twitchers' retreat. Less of its secrets are known in the lower part of the valley where Rafiki serves as the only destination to view them. Much of this area was unexplored when we first arrived. Once Rafki was built, it gave the first chance for birders to comfortably access these habitats. It was not long before the National Museum of Costa Rica led by Dr. Julio Sanchez (contributor to Birds of Costa Rica) knocked our door asking to take a peek. His initial survey came came up with 352 species. It was not the amount that impressed him, but cross over of species from the various regions of the country that really caught his eye. 

Tours

We offer a morning birding trip with our resident specialist. Rafiki is proud to present Steven Aguilar, a new member to our team, but an old soul when it comes to birds. Steven can show rookies the ropes as well as hear the whisper of a rare thrush. His trips are catered to the needs of the guests, because no 2 birders are the same!

You will see feathered friends throughout your stay even if you don't want to take guided trip. The deck of the main lodge provides excellent vantage of tree tops, the lake, and the open skies. We have a feeder at the reception desk. Imagine a cup of coffee, a nice telephoto lens, and a birding book... You will have lots of time to check off some birds before the "real adventures" begin!